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South Dakota State Library Services

A list of services provided by the South Dakota State Library.

Cataloging and Metadata

The World of Cataloging by WebJunction

WebJunction Course Catalog
The Course Catalog has over 10 webinar recordings and self-paced courses that you can take at any time on topics including basic cataloging, the "accidental" cataloger and an introduction to RDA. Accounts are free and you receive a certification of completion after you complete the course.

Library of Congress Classification
The Library of Congress Classification (LCC) is a classification system that was first developed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to organize and arrange the book collections of the Library of Congress.

Cutter Tables - Guidelines for using the LC Online Shelflist and formulating a literary author number
Cataloger's Reference Shelf - provided by the Library Corporation, also includes more detailed LC Cutter Tables

Dewey Decimal Classification - see WebDewey tab

MARC record information
The MARC formats are standards for the representation and communication of bibliographic and related information in machine-readable form
MARC Standards

South Dakota State Library Catalog
Search for both print and electronic items held by the South Dakota State Library.

South Dakota Share-It
Search library catalogs across the state of South Dakota

WorldCat
The world's largest online network of books and other materials, from more than 10,000 worldwide libraries. Select the WorldCat link once you access the OCLC's First Search database. 

Library of Congress
The Library of Congress is the nation's oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress.

University of Minnesota Libraries catalog

ODIN: Online Dakota Information Network  
North Dakota statewide library catalog

MNLink
MNLINK is a statewide system in Minnesota that serves as a discovery and interlibrary loan interface.

Barcodes
Barcodes are used in libraries to label books, magazines, CD/DVDs, and even patron cards. Most libraries in South Dakota use codabar barcodes. Codabar barcodes are the most frequently used barcodes in libraries.

Overview
The two main types of barcodes used in libraries are Code 39 and Codabar.
Code 39 was the first alphanumeric symbology to be developed. The rectangle of lines and spaces translates into 10 digits, but they are not displayed. The first digit is used to identify whether the barcode is for a patron or an item. The next two digits identify the institution. The last seven digits are a unique code which represent either a patron or an item.

Codabar barcodes are the most frequently used barcodes in libraries. The rectangle of lines and spaces translates into 14 digits. The first digit is used to identify whether the barcode is for a patron or an item. The next four digits identify the institution. The following eight digits represent patron or item information, and the final digit is an error-checking digit. See example below:


Contact SD State Library
Most libraries in South Dakota use codabar barcodes. To ensure consistency across the state it is recommended that libraries continue use of codabar barcodes. It is also recommended that before ordering barcodes, libraries contact the South Dakota State Library. The staff at the State Library can assign your library a barcode number. Contacting the State Library will guarantee that your library's barcode number will not duplicate another library's barcode number.
Please contact Nina Mentzel at Nina.Mentzel@state.sd.us   or 1-800-423-6665 or 605-280-6911

Purchasing through Minitex
A variety of library labels and label printers including pre-printed barcode labels, spine label printers, spine labels, CD/DVD labels, patron cards, and other forms of label printers to help libraries keep track of their collections.
Minitex: Symbology Barcode Products

Collection Development Training - from Arizona State Library

Collection Development page - American Library Association

CREW: A Weeding Manual for Modern Libraries
By the Texas State Library and Archives, this manual is designed for use primarily by librarians and staff in smaller community libraries and branches of larger systems.

Trash or Treasure - Important Facts about Old Books, Marilyn Wurzburger, 2001
Based on notes taken at the program, “Books Worth Collection” presented by Marilyn Wurzburger (Head of Special Collections, Arizona State University) on December 6, 2001 at the AzLA-MPLA Conference held in Phoenix, AZ.

Books Worth Collecting
Early Imprints Guide

Marilyn Wurzburger, Head of Special Collections, Arizona State University, 2001

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Questions?

Please contact:

Dustin Larmore, Interlibrary Loan/Cataloging Librarian

Dustin.Larmore@state.sd.us

605-773-5068

Nina Mentzel, Metadata Librarian

Nina.Mentzel@state.sd.us

605-280-6911